Opening tomorrow, October 2nd, the Victoria and Albert Museum, London and the Academy of Motion Picture Arts and Sciences will present the final showing of the groundbreaking multimedia exhibition Hollywood Costume in the historic Wilshire May Company building, the future location of the Academy Museum of Motion Pictures, at Wilshire Boulevard and Fairfax Avenue in Los Angeles. Organized by the Victoria and Albert Museum, London (V&A), and sponsored by Swarovski, this ticketed exhibition explores the central role of costume design – from the glamorous to the very subtle – as an essential tool of cinematic storytelling.

Tickets and more info: Oscars.org/hc

The Academy is enhancing the V&A’s exhibition and will include more than 150 costumes. The Academy’s presentation will add more than 40 costumes to this landmark show, including Jared Leto’s costume from Dallas Buyers Club (Kurt and Bart, 2013) – a recent acquisition from the Academy’s Collection – as well as costumes from such recent releases including The Hunger Games (Judianna Makovsky, 2012), Django Unchained  (Sharen Davis, 2012), Lee Daniels’ The Butler  (Ruth E. Carter, 2013), The Wolf of Wall Street  (Sandy Powell, 2013), American Hustle  (Michael Wilkinson, 2013), and The Great Gatsby  (Catherine Martin, 2013). In addition, Hollywood Costume will showcase the Academy’s pair of the most famous shoes in the world – the original ruby slippers from The Wizard of Oz (Adrian, 1939) shown with Dorothy’s blue and white gingham pinafore dress.

“We are thrilled to bring this innovative exhibition to Los Angeles,” said Cheryl Boone Isaacs, Academy President. “Hollywood Costume invites visitors to see some of the most well-known costumes from their favorite movies and to explore the impact designers have in creating our most beloved characters.”

Upending the conventions of what is considered “costume,” Hollywood Costume reveals what is hidden in plain sight: that films are about people, and the art of the costume designer helps create their characters. On view October 2, 2014, through March 2, 2015, the exhibition brings together iconic costumes from Hollywood’s Golden Age, including costumes for Marlene Dietrich from Morocco (1930) and Angel (1937) designed by Travis Banton, and from modern classics such as Mary Poppins (Tony Walton, 1964), Raiders of the Lost Ark (Deborah Nadoolman, 1981) and Titanic (Deborah L. Scott, 1997). 

Hollywood Costume is curated by Deborah Nadoolman Landis, Academy Award®-nominated costume designer and founding director of UCLA’s David C. Copley Center for the Study of Costume Design, whose credits include National Lampoon’s Animal House (1978), Raiders of the Lost Ark (1981), Coming to America (1988) and the music video for Michael Jackson’s “Thriller” (1983); with Sir Christopher Frayling (Professor Emeritus of Cultural History, Royal College of Art), and set and costume designer and V&A Assistant Curator Keith Lodwick.

“Cinematic icons are born when the audience falls deeply in love with the people in the story. And that’s what movies and costume design are all about,” notes Landis.

The exhibition is the culmination of a five-year effort to source, identify and secure objects from all over the world. The collectors who have loaned to the exhibition include major motion picture studios, costume houses, actors, public museums and archives, and private individuals.

lottereinigerforever:

Jeff Bridges by Peter van Agtmael 

lottereinigerforever:

Jeff Bridges by Peter van Agtmael 


Lauren Bacall on the set of We’re No Angels, 1955

Lauren Bacall on the set of We’re No Angels, 1955

disneypixar:

The walk from the location where Carl and Russell first arrive on the tepui to the top of Paradise Falls would be a 14.5 mile trek. When they look out across the landscape, it’s about 6.75 miles to the nearest tepui.

disneypixar:

The walk from the location where Carl and Russell first arrive on the tepui to the top of Paradise Falls would be a 14.5 mile trek. When they look out across the landscape, it’s about 6.75 miles to the nearest tepui.

FAVORITE MOVIES » Titanic (1997)
↳ “A woman’s heart is a deep ocean of secrets. But now you know there was a man named Jack Dawson and that he saved me… in every way that a person can be saved. I don’t even have a picture of him. He exists now… only in my memory.

A THOROUGHLY MODERN WARDROBE

Thoroughly Modern Millie (1967) showcases the glamorous “revolution in dress” that exploded during the roaring ‘20s. The costumes, designed by Oscar-winning costume designer Jean Louis, also highlight the resurrection of the flapper style in the 1960s with shorter dress hem lines, cropped hair and a less modest, more experimental style of dress. This era in fashion continued to be prominently showcased throughout the next few years in films such as The Boy Friend (1971) and The Great Gatsby (1974). 

From the Packard Humanities Institute Collection at the Academy Film Archive, “A Thoroughly Modern Wardrobe for Thoroughly Modern Millie” is a featurette released as part of the promotion of the film. Showcasing costumes and sketches from the motion picture, the featurette offers an inside look into Jean Louis’s  process for creating the wardrobe for Thoroughly Modern Millie

This fall the Victoria and Albert Museum, London and the Academy of Motion Picture Arts and Sciences will present the final showing of the groundbreaking multimedia exhibition Hollywood Costume in the historic Wilshire May Company building, the future location of the Academy Museum of Motion Pictures, at Wilshire Boulevard and Fairfax Avenue in Los Angeles. Organized by the Victoria and Albert Museum, London (V&A), and sponsored by Swarovski, this ticketed exhibition explores the central role of costume design – from the glamorous to the very subtle – as an essential tool of cinematic storytelling. Hollywood Costume will be accompanied by a full slate of exhibition-related programs including screenings, discussions with costume designers, and educational programs.

The Packard Humanities Institute Collection is the largest known acquisition of theatrical trailers on film, deposited at the Archive by David Packard in 2009. This historically significant collection contains over 60,000 media items and has transformed the Academy Film Archive into the world’s foremost repository of motion picture trailers.

Hollywood Costume curator Deborah Nadoolman Landis is answering questions right now on Reddit. 

http://bit.ly/AskHerAnything

Costumes from current films like The Hunger GamesDjango Unchained and Dallas Buyers Club will be presented under the same roof as iconic items like the original ruby slippers from The Wizard of Oz. Click the link above and ask her about the fascinating event, how she chose the items, or anything else that fits your mood.

David Fincher Filmography