The Virgin Suicides (1999) dir. Sofia Coppola.

"An actress can only play a woman. I’m an actor, I can play anything."

"I am an artist, art has no color and no sex."

"I’m fighting the label of black actress simply because it’s very limiting in people’s eyes, especially people who are making movies.”

"I don’t look like Halle Berry. But chances are she’s going to end up looking like me." 

- Whoopi Goldberg

Several ties have occurred in Academy Awards voting:

22nd (1949): Documentary (Short Subject)
A Chance to Live
So Much for So Little

41st (1968): Best Actress
Katharine Hepburn, The Lion in Winter
Barbra Streisand, Funny Girl

59th (1986): Documentary (Feature)
Artie Shaw: Time Is All You’ve Got
Down and Out in America

67th (1994: Short Film (Live Action)
Franz Kafka’s It’s a Wonderful Life
Trevor

85th (2012): Sound Editing
Skyfall
Zero Dark Thirty

But in 1932, two gentlemen shared the Oscar for Best Actor even though one of them had more votes than the other.

At the 5th Academy Awards, Fredric March, who starred in Dr. Jekyll and Mr. Hyde, and Wallace Beery, who starred in The Champ, “tied” even though March had one more vote than Beery.

They both received Oscars that night because the rules at the time stated that if an achievement came within three votes of the winner, then both would receive the award. That rule was soon altered, and subsequent ties were exact ties. 

Top photo: Wallace Beery, presenter Lionel Barrymore, host Conrad Nagel and Fredric March at the 5th Academy Awards banquet.

Middle photo: Lionel Barrymore, Conrad Nagel, and Wallace Beery.

Bottom photo: Oscar winners Frank Borzage (Directing, Bad Girl, 1931), Helen Hayes (Actress, The Sin of Madelon Claudet, 1931), and Fredric March.

Follow along as actress and movie fanatic Virginia Madsen is offered the opportunity to screen any film from the Academy Film Archive, then watches and analyzes with actor Nick Holmes the Oscar-winning comedy “Network.”

The Start of the Academy

As the Academy of Motion Picture Arts and Sciences officially welcomes more than 250 new members into its fold this week, we look back at the earliest days of our organization.

On January 11, 1927, thirty-six of Hollywood’s most prominent figures, including Louis B. Mayer, Mary Pickford, Sid Grauman, Jesse Lasky, Cecil B. DeMille, Douglas Fairbanks, Cedric Gibbons and Irving Thalberg, met to discuss the establishment of an honorary membership organization that would represent the motion picture community. As the industry leaders described in “The Reasons Why,” an early informational pamphlet, they wanted to create an organization that would “do for the motion picture profession in all its branches what other great national and international constructive bodies have done for other arts and sciences and industries.” 

The founding members of the Academy invited 300 industry notables to a banquet at the Biltmore Hotel on May 11, 1927, to celebrate and garner support for the fledgling organization, which by then was officially recognized by the State of California. That evening, 230 of the distinguished guests, representing the original five branches of the Academy­—Actors, Directors, Producers, Writers and Technicians—became members.

By the early 1930s, membership in the Academy had grown to more than 700 industry professionals, and the invitation-only group had begun to attract attention outside of California as a result of its annual awards ceremony. Among those thrilled to join the organization was actress Jean Harlow, who sent the following letter to the Board of Governors.

Materials documenting the history of the Academy and the Academy Awards can be viewed in Margaret Herrick Library Digital Collections.

From Parker Posey's diary from her first day of rehearsals for subUrbia (1996)
Day 1
I’ve just arrived in Austin to start a 2 week rehearsal on Richard “Rick” Linklater’s (Slacker, Dazed and Confused, Before Sunrise) new film SubUrbia. It’s written by Eric Bagosian, and was originally a Play staged for the theater in New York at The Lincoln Center.
*****I auditioned for the play, was up for the lead, “Sooze”, and was interrupted during a line of my dialog on the second page (of a 10 pg. audition piece), by the director, who said to me, “That’s enough, thank you.” I told him, “No, Thank YOU” and left….of course.****I wonder if he did this to all the actors, and if maybe if I hadn’t of left, if I woulda gotten the part. Different directors work in different ways. I dunno. It’s something I Still think about, wonder about…..contemplate.
A week ago, the whole cast and Rick and Eric got together to read the script 4 times in Los Angeles. There’s really nothing more exciting than hearing a piece of Work read over and over and over and over again. When I slept at night in the Hotel, the Whole script filled my being, and rang in my ears like a silver Bell bought at Tiffany’s. It Echoed through me, is what I mean. By the fourth read threw I was already hearing its essense, its meaning, its story, and its plot. 
Just to be really honest for a second, I must admit (and am not ashamed) that I was a little Sad that I couldn’t Highlight as many lines as all the other actors. Giovanni and Aimee and Nicky and Jace, and Steve, and Dina and Ajay ALL have more Lines than I do. Nicky’s highlighter marker ran out during one of his monolouges, and I coulda sworn he threw a Look to me, like, “You really should let me use YOUR highlighter PARKER.” But maybe I was being paranoid. I dunno. This sort of thing always happens to me when I get Immersed in a Role. I “lose” myself. I start thinking like my character and I get confused, as to which thoughts are mine, and which thoughts are Hers. Anyway. Back to me for a second: There are no Small Parts, just Small Actors. And I will be so good in the role of “Erica”.
Hm…
I just realized something….I bet Erica, is Eric’s favorite part, since his name is Eric, and my name is Erica.
Hm…

…..I will save that little tid bit for when I want a close up….
via Indiewire

From Parker Posey's diary from her first day of rehearsals for subUrbia (1996)

Day 1


I’ve just arrived in Austin to start a 2 week rehearsal on Richard “Rick” Linklater’s (Slacker, Dazed and Confused, Before Sunrise) new film SubUrbia. It’s written by Eric Bagosian, and was originally a Play staged for the theater in New York at The Lincoln Center.


*****I auditioned for the play, was up for the lead, “Sooze”, and was interrupted during a line of my dialog on the second page (of a 10 pg. audition piece), by the director, who said to me, “That’s enough, thank you.” I told him, “No, Thank YOU” and left….of course.****I wonder if he did this to all the actors, and if maybe if I hadn’t of left, if I woulda gotten the part. Different directors work in different ways. I dunno. It’s something I Still think about, wonder about…..contemplate.


A week ago, the whole cast and Rick and Eric got together to read the script 4 times in Los Angeles. There’s really nothing more exciting than hearing a piece of Work read over and over and over and over again. When I slept at night in the Hotel, the Whole script filled my being, and rang in my ears like a silver Bell bought at Tiffany’s. It Echoed through me, is what I mean. By the fourth read threw I was already hearing its essense, its meaning, its story, and its plot. 


Just to be really honest for a second, I must admit (and am not ashamed) that I was a little Sad that I couldn’t Highlight as many lines as all the other actors. Giovanni and Aimee and Nicky and Jace, and Steve, and Dina and Ajay ALL have more Lines than I do. Nicky’s highlighter marker ran out during one of his monolouges, and I coulda sworn he threw a Look to me, like, “You really should let me use YOUR highlighter PARKER.” But maybe I was being paranoid. I dunno. This sort of thing always happens to me when I get Immersed in a Role. I “lose” myself. I start thinking like my character and I get confused, as to which thoughts are mine, and which thoughts are Hers. Anyway. Back to me for a second: There are no Small Parts, just Small Actors. And I will be so good in the role of “Erica”.


Hm…


I just realized something….I bet Erica, is Eric’s favorite part, since his name is Eric, and my name is Erica.


Hm…


…..I will save that little tid bit for when I want a close up….

via Indiewire