vintagegal:

Psycho opened in New York City at the DeMille Theater (and the Baronet) on Thursday June 16th 1960

vintagegal:

Psycho opened in New York City at the DeMille Theater (and the Baronet) on Thursday June 16th 1960

The Early Art of Selling Movies

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Shortly after the dawn of what is now referred to as “Hollywood’s Golden Age” in the late 1920s, large motion picture studios like MGM, Paramount, and Fox – as a part of their marketing efforts – produced elaborate “exhibitors books.”  These books were sent to theater owners all over the country in an effort to promote films from a studio’s list of upcoming and in-production films.  The books are beautifully made and feature imaginative, colorful art from well-known illustrators. 

The Margaret Herrick Library’s periodical collection maintains a large number of these books from the heyday of Fox, Paramount, and Columbia studios, and has just added a selection of them to the Margaret Herrick Library Digital Collections.  These books make for fascinating browsing for film historians and laypeople alike as they offer a glimpse of the inner workings of the studio system.

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One of the hallmarks of that system was a roster of stars.  Before the advent of the “star system” in the 1950s (which is still in place today), actors and actresses had strict binding contracts with one particular studio and would appear in a number of that studio’s films.  For example, Columbia in the Thirties had Jimmy Stewart, Jean Arthur, and Rita Hayworth, while Paramount boasted Cary Grant and Marlene Dietrich. 

The exhibitors books highlight an interesting contradiction at work; while the film stars were subject to binding contracts which only allowed them to work for their own studio, illustrators (some, but not all) were free to move between studios, picking up work wherever it was available. The studios chose well-known illustrators for their exhibitors books, such as Alvan Cordell “Hap” Hadley and Ralph Iligan, who enjoyed greater privileges than artists who worked in the studio’s art department.  For example, they were allowed to sign their work and often worked in other industries besides film.

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Fred Kulz, who created much of the ghoulish artwork for Universal’s famous monster movies (including Frankenstein and The Mummy), was Universal’s in-house artist in the 1930s.  He must have had special standing at Universal as most of his work bears his signature.  An advertisement for Universal’s Frankenstein also provides evidence of a different version of the film than was eventually produced.  In fact, this is often the case with exhibitors books and is a large part of why they’re so interesting. Kulz’s ad names Bela Lugosi as the monster – a role eventually played by Boris Karloff. 

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starlords:

So that was Mrs Lundegaard on the floor in there. And I guess that was your accomplice in the wood chipper. And those three people in Brainerd. And for what? For a little bit of money. There’s more to life than a little money, ya know. Don’t ya know that? And here ya are, and it’s a beautiful day. Well. I just don’t understand it.

favourite movie monologues - Frances McDormand in Fargo (1996)

Do you know when I first started loving you?

On Friday, July 21, 1933, in preparation for the production of QUEEN CHRISTINA, Greta Garbo sat for a costume test with cinematographer William H. Daniels. This piece is an excerpt from the nine-minute long test. No need to adjust your speakers, there is no sound for this costume test. 

Directed by Rouben Mamoulian, QUEEN CHRISTINA premiered December 26, 1933 in New York and was released nationwide in 1934. 

The costume test was preserved by the Academy Film Archive in 2012 through “Project Film-to-Film,” aimed at preserving as many films on film as possible over a two-year period. The project allowed the Academy to make new elements for over 500 projects in the Archive’s collection.

darrenaronofskyed:

The Elephant Man (1980) directed by David Lynch.

People are frightened by what they don’t understand. 

laurensbacall:

Happy 90th birthday, Betty Joan Perske, a.k.a Lauren Bacall (16.09.1924) - (12.08.2014) ∞ 

“I’m not ashamed of what I am - of how I pass through this life. What I am has given me the strength to do it. At my lowest ebb I have never contemplated suicide. I value what is here too much. I have a contribution to make. I am not just take up space in this life. I can add something to the lives I touch. I don’t like everything I know about myself, and I’ll never be satisfied, but nobody’s perfect. I’m not sure where the next years will take me - what they will hold - but I’m open to suggestions.”

oldfilmsflicker:


Dr. Sara Jean Reynolds: I know that I love you, but I’m not sure that you can love me.Professor Philip Brainard: That’s ridiculous. I love you with all my heart, with every cell, with every molecule, with every atom. I love you on the subatomic level.

Movie Quote of the Day – Flubber, 1997 (dir. Les Mayfield) | the diary of a film history fanatic

oldfilmsflicker:

Dr. Sara Jean Reynolds: I know that I love you, but I’m not sure that you can love me.
Professor Philip Brainard: That’s ridiculous. I love you with all my heart, with every cell, with every molecule, with every atom. I love you on the subatomic level.

Movie Quote of the Day – Flubber, 1997 (dir. Les Mayfield) | the diary of a film history fanatic


On the set of Grand Hotel (1932)

On the set of Grand Hotel (1932)