Posts tagged Stanley Kubrick

STANLEY KUBRICK’S NAPOLEON

One of the most famous films never made, Napoleon was a dream project for director Stanley Kubrick after the release of 2001: A Space Odyssey (1968), for which he won an Oscar for Special Effects. However, numerous factors (particularly the perilous financial situation of MGM) meant that it would remain a dream instead of a finalized film.

The extensive documentation and other research from the project was later compiled into a lavish book, Stanley Kubrick’s Napoleon : The Greatest Movie Never Made, edited by Alison Castle and published by Taschen in 2009.  

The collection includes various drafts of the script as well as a facsimile final draft, costume and location scouting research, and notes on Napoleonic research for the film. The deluxe version was printed in a limited edition of 1000, with copy 0399 held at the Margaret Herrick Library

Remember the Grady daughters from “The Shining”? Here are Lisa and Louise Burns in 1980 and in 2014.

Remember the Grady daughters from “The Shining”? Here are Lisa and Louise Burns in 1980 and in 2014.

Stanley Kubrick commissioned hundreds of drawings from legendary graphic artist Saul Bass for art used in the posters and ads for “The Shining.” In this letter, Kubrick gives his thoughts on Bass’s early round of ideas.
Los Angeles Fans: Be sure to stop by the Academy to check out our Stanley Kubrick exhibition running now through March 2013.

Stanley Kubrick commissioned hundreds of drawings from legendary graphic artist Saul Bass for art used in the posters and ads for “The Shining.” In this letter, Kubrick gives his thoughts on Bass’s early round of ideas.

Los Angeles Fans: Be sure to stop by the Academy to check out our Stanley Kubrick exhibition running now through March 2013.

Riding The Subway With Stanley Kubrick In 1946

The Museum of the City of New York has posted an interesting collection of photos taken by Stanley Kubrick in 1946 when he worked as a staff photographer for LOOK magazine. Here’s some of them: